The Power Station

http://www.powerstationdallas.com/

214 827 0163

3816 Commerce Street

Dallas, TX

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CURRENT



PAST

Ella Kruglyanskaya: Grafika

The female figure has long been the focus of NY-based, Latvian-born Ella Kruglyanskaya’s work. Known for her bright cartoony paintings of women, here she presents […]

DB14

The Dallas Biennial continues…. Gary Cannone, Oliver Laric, Miklos Onucsan, Adrian Piper, and Konrad Smolenski.

Michael E. Smith

Smith’s work seems innocuous: tool parts and animal parts in a spare installation throughout the gallery read as remnants and remains.  

art as social wormhole: Reading Group

This is the first meeting of  reading group: “artificial M.F.A.” The group will read and meet to discuss classic and recent texts on art’s potential to […]

Walead Beshty: Fair Use

Collages of Mexican newspapers, a cold-war era films screening, and ceramic sculpture by red-hot LA art phenom.

Amarillo Entropy

The Power Station presents Amarillo Entropy, an exhibition comprised of artworks, artifacts, ephemera, screenings, and discussions, with Amarillo, Texas at its center. Using Robert Smithson’s writings […]

Tobias Madison, Emanuel Rossetti & Stefan Tcherepnin

A self-circulating water system and subsystems, suspended skins of cement, papier machéd lanterns, environmental sound, live and recorded performance, animations, lost cats and Dead Horse […]

Charles Mayton: Two-Step

New York-based artist Charles Mayton is a conceptual painter whose practice is at once object-oriented and theoretical. His paintings are witty and physically sumptuous “allegories […]

Generations Family Day at The Power Station

Art space The Power Station is hosting an all-ages art-making event featuring an interactive, freeform booklet activity designed by Oil and Cotton. Visitors Also, an […]

Jacob Kassay: No Goal

Jacob Kassay is an emerging contemporary American artist whose practice includes painting, sculpture, site-specific installation and video.

Virginia Overton: Deluxe

Drawing on her upbringing in rural Tennessee, Overton uses ratchet straps, timber, ladders, commercial grade lighting and electrical fittings, as materials for intuitive sculptural arrangements.