Artmotel open house

Tuesday it’s open studio night at Artmotel Dallas. On April 22, from 6-8 pm Ted Kincaid, Jay Shinn, Joan Winter, Michael Tole, Lee Mascarenhas and the Marty Walker Gallery open their doors to all the world promising "burgers, beer and margaritas" at 2137 Farringdon St., Dallas.

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  1. This film doesn’t need to be digested it needs to be forgotten. a very hollow piece of celluloid.

    taken from a much more sensible review.

    “Every time Kelly manages to build up a halfway decent head of comic froth — as in a fast-talking sequence wherein Boxer is reunited with his estranged wife (Moore, very funny) and in-laws — he blows it with some god-awful portent or “statement.” You haven’t lived until you’ve seen Justin Timberlake lip-sync a ridiculous Killers song, true, but watching it you might wish you’d never lived, period. When I first saw this picture I figured it as the bilious result of an imaginary drinking match between Philip K. Dick and Thomas Pynchon; second time around, it’s clear that Kelly fancies himself some kind of cross between Stanley Kubrick and Alan Wolfe. Fat chance on either count, particularly the Kubrick — Kelly’s camera placement and framing are at best textbook and at worst calamitously mediocre.

    A good number of this film’s defenders, incidentally, have been taking Kelly’s cue and making noises that those who aren’t with the program “don’t get it” or somehow resent it. The normally sensible J. Hoberman of the Village Voice took the latter tack, which is disappointing — what’s there to resent, really, about puling, know-somethingish post-adolescent angst? In any case, to paraphrase Robert Christgau, I dare you to spend money to find out which camp is right.” – Glenn Kenny for Premier

  2. I’m gonna side with the camp that says you really didn’t get it. Though the casting is directly referencing that of a teen movie, this is isn’t meant to be a conventional comedy, or even a satire of conventional comedies. The fact that there are funny moments is incidental. If the film seems hollow, that’s because American culture is an ultimately empty experience. That’s the core of Kelly’s film, and he communicates in both beautifully subtle and unsubtle ways. I will never forget the Rock drinking from an unbroken six pack of beer while a rabid fan demands to fellate him. Genius.

  3. It’s like Matthew Barney and David Lynch and the guy who made Repo Man all got together and tried to make a really fucked up story. So much going on. So Many layers. Kelly is Genius!!! All the haters need to get a life. Just cause you don’t understand it don’t mean it’s bad!

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